Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Policies)

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SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Policies)
9 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2017
Organization, Consolidation and Presentation of Financial Statements [Abstract]  
Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

GulfSlope considers highly liquid investments with insignificant interest rate risk and original maturities to the Company of three months or less to be cash equivalents. Cash equivalents consist primarily of interest-bearing bank accounts and money market funds. The Company’s cash positions represent assets held in checking and money market accounts. These assets are generally available on a daily or weekly basis and are highly liquid in nature.

Liquidity/Going Concern

Liquidity/Going Concern

 

The Company has incurred accumulated losses as of June 30, 2017 of $38.7 million. Further losses are anticipated in developing our business. As a result, our auditors have expressed substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. As of June 30, 2017, we had $.02 million of unrestricted cash on hand. The Company estimates that it will need to raise a minimum of $4 million to meet its obligations and planned expenditures through August 2018. The Company plans to finance its operations through the issuance of equity and debt, joint ventures including farm-outs, or further sales of working interests in prospects. Our policy has been to periodically raise funds through sale of equity on a limited basis, to avoid undue dilution while at the early stages of execution of our business plan. Short term needs have been historically funded through loans from executive management and other related parties. There are no assurances that financing will be available with acceptable terms, if at all. If the Company is not successful in obtaining adequate financing, operations would need to be curtailed or ceased, including those associated with being a public reporting company. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

Full Cost Method

Full Cost Method

 

The Company uses the full cost method of accounting for its oil and gas exploration and development activities as defined by the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Under the full cost method of accounting, all costs associated with successful and unsuccessful exploration and development activities are capitalized on a country-by-country basis into a single cost center (“full cost pool”). Such costs include property acquisition costs, geological and geophysical (“G&G”) costs, carrying charges on non-producing properties, costs of drilling both productive and non-productive wells and overhead charges directly related to acquisition, exploration and development activities. Proceeds from property sales will generally be credited to the full cost pool, with no gain or loss recognized, unless such a sale would significantly alter the relationship between capitalized costs and the proved reserves attributable to these costs.  A significant alteration would typically involve a sale of 25% or more of the proved reserves related to a single full cost pool.

 

Proved properties are amortized on a country-by-country basis using the units of production method (UOP). The UOP calculation multiplies the percentage of estimated proved reserves produced each quarter by the cost of those reserves. The amortization base in the UOP calculation includes the sum of proved property, net of accumulated depreciation, depletion and amortization (DD&A), estimated future development costs (future costs to access and develop proved reserves), and asset retirement costs, less related salvage value.

 

The costs of unproved properties and related capitalized costs (such as G&G costs) are withheld from the amortization calculation until such time as they are either developed or abandoned. Unproved properties and properties under development are reviewed for impairment at least quarterly and are determined through an evaluation considering, among other factors, seismic data, requirements to relinquish acreage, drilling results, remaining time in the commitment period, remaining capital plan, and political, economic, and market conditions. In countries where proved reserves exist, exploratory drilling costs associated with dry holes are transferred to proved properties immediately upon determination that a well is dry and amortized accordingly. In countries where a reserve base has not yet been established, impairments are charged to earnings.

 

Companies that use the full cost method of accounting for oil and natural gas exploration and development activities are required to perform a ceiling test calculation each quarter. The full cost ceiling test is an impairment test prescribed by SEC Regulation S-X Rule 4-10. The ceiling test is performed quarterly, on a country-by-country basis, utilizing the average of prices in effect on the first day of the month for the preceding twelve-month period. The ceiling limits such pooled costs to the aggregate of the present value of future net revenues attributable to proved crude oil and natural gas reserves discounted at 10%, plus the lower of cost or market value of unproved properties less any associated tax effects. If such capitalized costs exceed the ceiling, the Company will record a write-down to the extent of such excess as a non-cash charge to earnings. Any such write-down will reduce earnings in the period of occurrence and results in a lower depreciation, depletion and amortization rate in future periods. A write-down may not be reversed in future periods even though higher oil and natural gas prices may subsequently increase the ceiling.

 

As of June 30, 2017, the Company’s oil and gas properties consisted of unproved properties and no proved reserves.

Basic and Dilutive Earnings Per Share

Basic and Dilutive Earnings Per Share

 

Basic earnings (loss) per share (“EPS”) is computed by dividing net income (loss) (the numerator) by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period (denominator). Diluted EPS is computed by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of common shares and potential common shares outstanding (if dilutive) during each period. Potential common shares include stock options, warrants, and restricted stock. The number of potential common shares outstanding relating to stock options, warrants, and restricted stock is computed using the treasury stock method.

 

As the Company has incurred losses for the nine months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the potentially dilutive shares are anti-dilutive and are thus not added into the loss per share calculations. As of June 30, 2017 and 2016, there were 163,805,888 and 81,885,606 potentially dilutive shares, respectively.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2014, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2014-09 (“ASU No. 2014-09”), which requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. The ASU will replace most existing revenue recognition guidance in GAAP when it becomes effective. As amended, the new standard is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017. Early application is permitted. The standard permits the use of either the retrospective or cumulative effect transition method. The Company has no revenues to date and does not anticipate the adoption of this standard to have a material impact on its financial statements.

 

In August 2014, the FASB issued Accounting Standard Update No. 2014-15 (“ASU No. 2014-15”), Presentation of Financial Statements Going Concern (Subtopic 205-40) which requires management to assess an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern by incorporating and expanding upon certain principles that are currently in U.S. auditing standards. Specifically, ASU No. 2014-15 provides a definition of the term substantial doubt and requires an assessment for a period of one year after the date that the financial statements are issued (or available to be issued). It also requires certain disclosures when substantial doubt is alleviated as a result of consideration of management’s plans and requires an express statement and other disclosures when substantial doubt is not alleviated. ASU No. 2014-15 is now effective, and has been adopted by the Company. See the liquidity and going concern section of Note 2 for the further discussion on management’s analysis.

 

On February 25, 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). The new guidance establishes the principles to report transparent and economically neutral information about the assets and liabilities that arise from leases. The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years, and early application is permitted for all organizations. The Company has not yet selected the period during which it will implement this pronouncement, and it is currently evaluating the impact the adoption of ASU 2016-02 will have on its financial statements.

 

In March 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-09, “Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting” (“ASU 2016-09”). ASU 2016-09 simplifies several aspects of accounting for share-based payment award transactions, including income tax consequences, classification of awards as either liability or equity, and classification on the statement of cash flows. The standard is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact the adoption of ASU 2016-09 will have on its financial statements.

 

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-06, Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): Contingent Put and Call Options in Debt Instruments (a consensus of the Emerging Issues Task Force) (“ASU 2016-06”), which clarifies the requirements for assessing whether contingent call (put) options that can accelerate the payment of principal on debt instruments are clearly and closely related to their debt hosts and requires that an entity assess the embedded call (put) options solely in accordance with the four-step decision sequence in ASC 815. ASU 2016-06 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. The Company is currently evaluating the impact the adoption of ASU 2016-06 will have on its financial statements.

 

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments, which addresses diversity in how certain cash receipts and cash payments are presented and classified in the statement of cash flows.  ASU 2016-15 provides guidance on the following specific cash flow issues: debt prepayment or debt extinguishment costs; settlement of zero-coupon debt instruments or other debt instruments with coupon interest rates that are insignificant in relation to the effective interest rate of the borrowing; contingent consideration payments made after a business combination; proceeds from the settlement of insurance claims; proceeds from the settlement of corporate-owned life insurance policies, including bank-owned life insurance policies; distributions received from equity method investees; beneficial interests in securitization transactions; and separately identifiable cash flows and application of the predominance principle.  ASU 2016-15 is effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. The Company is still evaluating the impact of this update, but does not expect it to have a material impact on its financial statements.

 

The Company has evaluated all other recent accounting pronouncements and believes that none of them will have a significant effect on the Company’s financial statements.